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“The sound of the atmosphere in the weather changed my style. But I could

hear, since me being an air-music man. The air came in different, with a different sound of music. Well, the atmosphere, when the wind blowing carries music along. I don’t know if it affect you or not, but it’s a sounding that’s in the air, you see? And I don’t know where it comes from-it could come from the airplanes, or the moaning of automobiles, but anyhow it leaves an air current in the air, you see? That gets in the wind, makes a sounding, you know. And that sounding works up to be a blues.”

-Robert Pete Johnson.

 

Studying Physics drives me to want to analyse the world, to describe and understand

it. This project allowed me to play around with some of the concepts I’ve

come across in the past three years, to take it and apply it in a less clinical manner.

We set out with music in mind for this piece. We began by trying to exploit sound

as a pressure wave to drive movement, but here we are, the opposite of that;

movement driving sound. Our movement through the space, in turn moving the

rods, causes a change in the field between the radios and gives us sound. The

sound describes the movement of the observer, the air, the rods, the currents in

the circuitry of the radios and the magnetic fields produced by them.

-Joe Bonfield (UCD)

 

Air Music 

by Nick Boon (NCAD) &Joseph Bonfield (UCD) 2012

STUDENT PROJECTS

ARKITEKT

ARKITEKT

 

I find it hard to comprehend electromagnetic waves, these invisible massless

forces, that apart from a narrow band of frequencies, cannot be sensed. I find it

amazing that the simple arrangement of materials (a conductor, and a semiconductor)

of the right dimensions interact with them to form a radio.

I guess artists would be attempting the same thing: picking up currents from the

atmosphere around them and transforming them, making them visible. They make

themselves into aerials, and amplify certain resonating signals from the slew of

noise around them with the arrangement of whatever materials are to hand.

-Nick Boon (NCAD)

 

 

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